THREE PLAYERS THAT COST THREE LIVERPOOL MANAGERS THEIR JOBS

Friends Of Liverpool

Gerard Houllier, Rafael Benitez and  have all lost their jobs at Liverpool mainly due to spending crazy money for players who were not fit to don the red shirt of Liverpool.

1. El Hadji Diouf:

Gerard Houllier bought the Senegal striker after the 2002 World Cup, in which they beat the mighty France, for £10 million, I seem to remember at the time.

Liverpool had finished second to Man Utd the Season before, but the purchase of Diouf and Liverpool’s subsequent decline in the League the next Season prompted Houllier’s departure from Anfield.

2. Alberto Aquilani:

After the great Xabi Alonso, left Liverpool for Real Madrid simply because Rafa Benitez had tried to sign the anonymous Gareth Barry at Anfield, Liverpool were left with a midfield void.

Benitez, in his wisdom, signed Aquilani from AS Roma for £16 million as an injured player and while the little Italian recovered from his leg injuries, Liverpool slipped down to seventh in 2009/10 having finished second, again to Man Utd the year before.

Benitez, having won the Champion’s League and the FA Cup, left Liverpool by mutual consent.

3. Andy Carroll:

The return of Kenny Dalglish as Liverpool’s Manager was greeted with happiness by everyone(myself included) and having guided Liverpool to a 5th place finish in the 2009/10 Season, he was awarded a three-year contract by the owners.

Time has shown that he wasted his opportunity by signing average players for over-inflated prices, Downing, Henderson, Adam and most notably Andy Carroll from Newcastle.

Its true that once Torres went to Chelsea at the 11th hour of the January transfer window of 2011, Liverpool were then compelled into making an emergency signing.

Sadly, £35 million was squandered on an unproven and unfit forward who made 44 appearances for Liverpool scoring just six goals.

Liverpool finished 8th last Season and despite winning the League Cup, Kenny Dalglish was also sacked.

So, the lesson is, don’t put your job on the line by spending big money on under-performing, over-hyped players or it will cost you your job.

Something tells me that Brendan Rodgers won’t copy the mistakes of his predecessors.